Label Code Unlocks Story of Clothes

Posted on Jul 21 2015 - 5:49pm by John Peters
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Rise in demand for transparency in the garment industry inspires a new business to find a way to reveal all

children’s clothes range features denim jeans, dresses and culottes, all of which carry their own special label code

children’s clothes range features denim jeans, dresses and culottes, all of which carry their own special label code

A simple code printed on a garment label is giving mums and dads an instant way of finding out how their kids’ clothes were made, as well as introducing them to the workers who made them. The Where Does It Come From? children’s clothes range features denim jeans, dresses and culottes, all of which carry their own special label code. With 64%¹ of mothers actively buying sustainable brands, and 69%² of UK adults keen to buy ethical clothing it if was more widely stocked, it’s an idea that answers a growing demand for traceable fashion.

By tapping in a special code printed on the clothes’ label into a website, buyers can instantly read about and see photographs of the garments being created by skilled workers at their source in India. The concept has proved popular, leading to Where Does It Come From? to now also offer handmade, block-printed scarves and most recently, a new range of fun printed summers shirts for kids.

Where Does It Come From? is the brainchild of Jo Salter, a corporate manager who got frustrated at the lack of transparency of origin, the poor treatment of garment workers and the wasteful practices involved in the clothing she was buying for her and her family. Jo gave up the corporate job and started looking for the right partners for her enterprise. She found what she was looking for in MoralFibre, a leading pioneer in traditional, hand-made fabric making that uses natural fibres and dyes, based in Gujarat, India.  MoralFibre uses little electricity and no heavy machinery or harmful chemicals in making its fabrics. Where Does It Come From? has a ‘Cradle to Cradle’ philosophy, meaning it believes all of its processes should nourish and enhance the environment, and the people involved, rather than damage it.  Where Does It Come From? is licenced by the Fairtrade Foundation and is working towards full use of the Fairtrade Mark.

Jo comments: “I want people to love their clothes – not just because they are attractive, comfortable and practical, but also because they have an understanding of who made them, how they did it and the realities of what’s involved in the whole process.  I’m hoping this deeper understanding will build a closer connection with what we wear and inspire us all in our buying choices”
Garment manufacturing is the world’s third largest industry, yet one of the most polluting. Fashion globally is second only to oil in terms of its environmental impact, with 25% of

Where Does It Come From? is the brainchild of Jo Salter, a corporate manager who got frustrated at the lack of transparency of origin

Where Does It Come From? is the brainchild of Jo Salter, a corporate manager who got frustrated at the lack of transparency of origin

chemicals produced worldwide used for textiles³.

The garment industry and fashion as a whole is coming under increasing scrutiny, with movements such as the Rana Plaza-inspired annual Fashion Revolution day, and Global Poverty Project’s See Through Fashion, both campaigning for safe working conditions and greater transparency in the fashion industry’s supply chains.

For further information visit www.wheredoesitcomefrom.co.uk

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